Coronavirus-related relief for retirement plans and IRAs questions and answers | Internal Revenue Service

Let me get this straight. On one hand people don’t need their retirement money so we waive mandatory distributions (RMDs) because a tanked stock market will cause the lose of investments. On the other hand, we do what we can to make preretirement withdrawals and loans easier to obtain which creates the same adverse result the RMD suspension seeks to avoid.

Q4. What is a coronavirus-related distribution?

A4. A coronavirus-related distribution is a distribution that is made from an eligible retirement plan to a qualified individual from January 1, 2020, to December 30, 2020, up to an aggregate limit of $100,000 from all plans and IRAs.

Q5. Do I have to pay the 10% additional tax on a coronavirus-related distribution from my retirement plan or IRA?

A5. No, the 10% additional tax on early distributions does not apply to any coronavirus-related distribution.

Q6. When do I have to pay taxes on coronavirus-related distributions?

A6. The distributions generally are included in income ratably over a three-year period, starting with the year in which you receive your distribution. For example, if you receive a $9,000 coronavirus-related distribution in 2020, you would report $3,000 in income on your federal income tax return for each of 2020, 2021, and 2022. However, you have the option of including the entire distribution in your income for the year of the distribution.

Q7. May I repay a coronavirus-related distribution?

A7. In general, yes, you may repay all or part of the amount of a coronavirus-related distribution to an eligible retirement plan, provided that you complete the repayment within three years after the date that the distribution was received. If you repay a coronavirus-related distribution, the distribution will be treated as though it were repaid in a direct trustee-to-trustee transfer so that you do not owe federal income tax on the distribution.

If, for example, you receive a coronavirus-related distribution in 2020, you choose to include the distribution amount in income over a 3-year period (2020, 2021, and 2022), and you choose to repay the full amount to an eligible retirement plan in 2022, you may file amended federal income tax returns for 2020 and 2021 to claim a refund of the tax attributable to the amount of the distribution that you included in income for those years, and you will not be required to include any amount in income in 2022. See sections 4.D, 4.E, and 4.F of Notice 2005-92 for additional examples.

Source: Coronavirus-related relief for retirement plans and IRAs questions and answers | Internal Revenue Service

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