Observations on life

Making It Work – A secure retirement

In this article I outline some tips for a secure retirement 🤑🤑🤑 from start to finish. Take a look.

I’M ONE of the fortunate Americans with a pension. I know firsthand the sense of financial security that comes with steady monthly income. Others don’t have it so easy. I worry a great deal about the majority of Americans—including my four children—who have no pension, and instead will rely on Social Security and their investments for their retirement income.

My fear: Even if these folks are saving regularly, they don’t really understand how to invest or how to manage their nest egg once retired. Consider a couple earning $60,000 a year who retire at age 66. The main breadwinner’s Social Security benefit might be $18,000 a year. Add spousal benefits, and we’re looking at $27,000 for the couple. Their goal is to replace 100% of their income in retirement.

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Source: Making It Work – HumbleDollar

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3 replies »

  1. Eventually the socialists will win a major political election and probably collapse the economy through taxation and regulation…replacing retirement income will become a joke.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Although we may disagree on some issues, on this one we are in total agreement. So many people have a fallback retirement account but in today’s world there are many who lack that security. And even if you do have a pension that too may be in jeopardy. Asking our children to start thinking about retirement is often a subject too distant in their future for them to take serious action. Secondly, there is no clear educational plan to educate them until it is late in their careers. Like Health Care, discussions need to occur often to keep the subject in the forefront over that new everything vehicle or large pool in the yard. Thank you for all your accurate reporting on Retirement Planning and Health Care.

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    • I have failed on this matter with my kids. Market forces (Madison Ave), spouses, Internet, and politicians have a stronger message that they like to hear. Buy it now, pay later and or the government will give you free stuff. My kids still do not see me as an example of the benefits of saving. I have visited all 50 states, Europe, done cruises, been to Las Vegas and Disney World multiple times and I still retired at 55, only two years ago.

      I have been trying to figure out how I learned to save money. I never had a financial talk, I came from a broken home. I was told if I want a new bike for my paper route I would have to save for it in the mid 1970s. Or was it the high inflation of the early 1980s that made me save? Was it getting real interest in my savings account until the banks were deregulated? Back then 4.25% was a standard passbook, 7.5% for CDs compared to some banks current rate of 0.05%- 2.15% today. You could see real money growth on a 7.5% CD instead of pennies on a 0.05% account. Maybe it was the 14% mortgages, 18% car loans, and very low credit card limits back then that made me save. I am sure that the lack of easy credit until the mid 1990s had a lot to do with it too. Back in 2005 they were giving college freshmen credit cards without any jobs.

      Until the housing crisis, it seem like people just want to buy stuff. Today, it seems like people just want to have experiences while they have money in their pocket. People want to take pictures of their food instead of eating it. The affluenza of two decades ago has been replaced with trying to keep up with the Jones on Facebook and Twitter.

      There are more ads that want you to spend money than there are for saving money and if you hear a message enough times, you are going to believe it. Spend now, it will be ok.

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