At Work

The age of zero responsibility

There is a heated discussion on Twitter started by Sen Warren on the subject of private college scams and loan forgiveness.

They (for-profit colleges) recruited aggressively, targeting non-traditional students — usually older people who had jobs and could only study part-time. They also focused heavily on women, people of color and veterans. But after graduating, many students struggled to find jobs that were promised to them or to transfer credits to other schools, leading to massive student loan defaults. A 2010 government study found that all of the 15 for-profit colleges evaluated by undercover agents made deceptive statements to prospective students and four of them encouraged fraudulent practices.

The Obama administration cracked down hard on for-profit colleges, pressuring Corinthian and ITT to close and approved at least $655 million in loan cancellations from those chains in recent years. At the same time, the administration also passed revisions to the borrower defense regulation and to another similar rule, known as gainful employment, with the aim of increasing students’ protections. Source: CBSnews.com

People agreeing with her maintain these eighteen year olds (an assumption) were scamed as to loan obligations and promised future jobs that were unrealistic. They also believe these students, because of their age, were incapable of making judgements and knowing they were being mislead.

Does that make sense? Is that an excuse? In addition, my 75 year old curmudgeon brain tells me that an eighteen year old high school graduate should be able to understand the basics of a loan and should ask questions. In addition, when seeking a career they should be able to go to the internet and check the average pay and the real world demand for such jobs and then put the two together and say, ummmm does this work?

But even if they can’t, there is guidance available either as described below or from parents or other relatives. Doesn’t anyone take responsibility?

According to bigfuturecollegeboard.org high school guidance counselors can assist with college planning in several ways, including:

College Planning

A school counselor can steer you toward colleges that are right for you by recommending colleges that fit with your academic record and career goals. When it comes time to apply, your counselor plays a big role in the process.

Paying for College

The government, colleges and private organizations offer students money to help pay for college. Your school counselor is a good resource for information about this financial aid and can give you insight on how the process works. Be sure to ask about scholarships, which offer money you don’t have to pay back.

After you get into a college, your school counselor can help answer your questions about your financial aid package.

Then there is this concern. How can someone so gullible be qualified to vote? I think it’s a valid question but admittedly irrelevant at this point, but I still find it a bit unnerving.

Forgiving the loans these students incurred does something else. It teaches them that if you screw up and claim an excuse, someone, someone you don’t even know will bail you out. Where is the percentage is taking responsibility?

In 21st century America there is always an excuse.

Advertisements

1 reply »

  1. There is another part of the story here. Since welfare reform in the early 90s, the government required able body people to find jobs or to be enrolled in “job training”. These for profit schools offered a way for these “students” to stay on welfare at the government insistence. These schools would enrolled them in programs which the students did not have even the basic academic skills needed, in programs to certifications only to find that they can’t get jobs because of their criminal backgrounds. The trade schools were flooding the markets with the same skills year after year such as hairdressers which keeps the wages low and some skills which were outdated. NPR did a story on this a few years ago.

    I know that the Woodbury Public School systems since the mid 1970’s pushed everybody to college. They got rid of all the shop classes. Government at all levels was and still is pushing everybody to go to college. Yes, college will help lift you out of poverty but you need some academic skills to succeed. College’s greed for the government guaranteed loans lowered the standards for entry and gave these people false hopes. Go to college no matter what the costs, it will be worth it, unless you were set up to fail. The people were not smart enough to college in the first place and they were not smart enough to know better because they all believed the hype. They didn’t know how to investigate the schools or the degrees, they just saw dollars signs when the graduated.

    Yes there has to be personal responsibility and they should be made to pay back their loans. I am not willing to pay for them to go to college, I paid for myself.

    But this is another example of what happens when the government offers a blank check in the form of guaranteed student loans. Same things happen in housing and medicare, people find a way to get that money from the government.

    Like

What's your opinion on this post? Readers would like your point of view.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s