Government

Insurers refuse to cover a range of services … and the point is?

Does your auto insurance cover an oil  change or a new paint job or new tires? Silly, right? Why? Because these services are routine, elective or even cosmetic. But most important, if these services were covered, your insurance premiums would be astronomical. 

Why is it then that we have such a hard time making the connection between covered health care services and health insurance premiums? 

Studies done long before Obamacare indicated that federal and state benefit mandates added as much as 25% to health insurance costs (premiums). Yet as you can see below, we continue to criticize insurance companies because they “refuse to cover a range of medical services.”  

Every time we come up with a new cause, in this case the stretch that problems caused by elective cosmetic surgery mostly used by women should be paid for by our health insurance, we add to the cost of coverage for everyone. 

Just as government has no money except that which it takes from its citizens, insurance companies have no money except what the insured pay in premiums. There is no government or insurance company with some disconnected pool of money to give us. 

If the logic seems tenuous, where is the logic in making everyone pay, including taxpayers, for the issues after a botched boob job, or for that matter for “free” birth control for people who can easily afford it or for a 26 year old with a job, and a wife. 

But a new analysis of 109 qualified health plans by the National Women’s Law Center and the Commonwealth Fund finds that insurers regularly refuse to cover a range of medical services that are disproportionately used by women.

The most common prohibition — exercised by 42 percent of the examined health plans — relates to any condition that is the result of a noncovered service, such as cosmetic surgery. The logic there seems tenuous. Skateboarding is not a “covered service,” either, but presumably injuries resulting from it are covered, right?

Source: benefitspro.com

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